The ultimate motivation music…

Any excuse to post this great song! Gotta catch em all!

PS: The music dept was the location of a Squirtle yesterday!

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Will we ever run out of new music?

WILL WE EVER RUN OUT OF NEW MUSIC?

Lots of modern songs sound like other songs, you can see for yourself from this website: http://www.soundsjustlike.com/

  • iTunes contains 28 million songs
  • last.fm contains 45 million songs
  • grace note database contains 130 million different songs to give you a picture of how big that number is, if you wanted to listen to all of the songs on the gracenote database it would take you well over a 1000 years…

But since there are finite number of tones our ears can distinguish and because it only takes a few notes in common for two musical ideas to sound similar, will we ever run out of new music? Will there ever be a day where every little brief melody has been written and recorded and we are left with nothing new to make?

Michael Stevens from Vsauce attempts to answer this question, watch this video to find out the answer to this question, will we ever run out of new music, and if we do how long will it take for everything to run out?

 

Ludivico Einaudi “Elegy for the Arctic”

This piece was specially written as a way to show the importance of protecting the Artic and maintains Einaudi’s unique style of writing.

 

The video is set in the Arctic and creates a calm atmosphere whilst listening to the piece.  The music perfectly illustrates the delicate and fragile scenery. It begins with a gentle, quiet introduction which builds in time with the crumbling of the surrounding icebergs. In the middle of the piece there is a great climax which drifts from the main motif by repeating a new descending motif which is played in canon then unison. This unison provides power and uses the lower register of the piano to evoke a dangerous edge.  The purpose of the video is expressed as the icebergs collapse with the climax of the music. There are even sections where the waves compliment the music.

Peter Gabriel – Orchestral ‘Heroes’ Cover

Peter Gabriel released ‘Scratch my Back’ in 2010. The album features multiple covers of popular songs, but done only with orchestral instruments; we are allowed to see what songs would sound like if the original artist used a completely different set of instruments.

Due to it being the first track of the album, Gabriel’s ‘Heroes’ cover seemed the most appropriate cover to post. Gabriel provides an alternate world, where ‘Heroes’ is stripped of its electric instruments and sounds. I’ll leave it down to you to decide which version is better.

David Garrett ~ Palladio

This version of Palladio is very good. I personally love the fact that the orchestra includes not only the traditional instruments but also electric guitars. These guitars really add to the texture as at climatic points they double with Garrett (0:45) and provide contrast between sections. Also the drums provide a beat underneath. Overall I would say that these additional instruments offer a more ‘modern’ rendition of the original. I also love the way that the violins in the orchestra provide a rich texture underneath with the soloist play in over the top which wouldn’t usually happen in an orchestra with all of the first violins traditionally playing the tune.

What makes a song original?

http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/music-theatre/2016/06/what-makes-song-original-ed-sheeran-matt-cardle-and-blurred-lines

This article identifies many controversies during the last few years over plagiarism in music, such as the Blurred Lines case, Led Zeppelin’s Stairway to Heaven, and more recently between songwriters Martin Harrington and Thomas Leonard and Ed Sheeran, claiming that ‘Photograph’ is too similar to Matt Cardle’s ‘Amazing’.

It talks about the method of identifying possible copyright nowadays, questioning how they are too focused on the melody. In my opinion, this is a good point, as although melody is arguably the most easily identified musical element, there are also many other elements in songs, such as instrumentation and harmony.

“Works alike may be original. It is not essential that any production, to be original or new within the meaning of the law of copyright, shall be different from another.”

http://www.newstatesman.com/culture/music-theatre/2016/06/what-makes-song-original-ed-sheeran-matt-cardle-and-blurred-lines

Snarky Puppy feat. Knower and Jeff Coffin – I remember

The indefatigable Snarky Puppy and Knower collaborated earlier this year on an unbelievable track – ‘I remember’. The song features everything you’d expect from Snarky Puppy (ridiculously tight rhythm section, uptempo fast changes and energetic atmosphere) combined with Louis Cole’s fantastic drumming and Genevieve Artadi’s stylish vocals. (The vocal scat with the saxes at 2.36 is just great!)